The woman who became the first black doctor in Canada to become the first to be named to the prestigious Royal College of Physicians has been accused of perpetuating white privilege.

Dr. Yvette Mascaro, a former assistant professor at McMaster University, has been called out for her “white privilege” by a group of female students who allege she had made racist remarks to them.

CBC News has learned the accusations stem from an incident last year in which a group on campus went on a campus-wide chant of “black power” during a class.

The chant was called out by a female student who was one of the students who spoke to CBC News.

“I heard the chant and I was really angry and I wasn’t feeling comfortable,” said the woman who asked that her name not be used.

She said she had just returned from an orientation meeting at McMaster and was in the middle of class when she heard the professor’s voice over the speakerphone.

A professor, the woman said, said to her, “We know what you’re thinking, you’re white.

And so you think that because you’re a white person you should be able to do that.”

“And so I was like, ‘What?

I’m not white?'” the woman recalled.

“And she said, ‘Well, you are a person of colour, so you know that there are people of colour on campus that have different experiences.

So if you’re just going to do it because you think you can do it, you can’t do it.”‘

We have an opportunity to create the conditions that can help you achieve your full potential’ The student said she confronted the professor, who responded by saying she should be allowed to have a white privilege because she was white and because she had experienced racism before.

According to the CBC report, the professor said she could not recall the last time she had faced racism, but that “in this day and age, that’s something that we are going to have to deal with.”

The CBC News report also says the professor had a history of making racist comments to other students, including a student who alleged that she had to explain that “people of colour” were being called “niggers” to avoid racism.

In response, the McGill University President and the university’s vice-provost of academic affairs issued a statement Friday denying the accusations.

“The statement goes on to say that we want to ensure that there is no culture of intolerance and that we ensure that everyone is treated with respect. “

“This is a difficult time for all of us at McGill and we ask for the public’s patience while we work through this challenging period.””

The McMaster University President’s office has not responded to a request for comment.”

This is a difficult time for all of us at McGill and we ask for the public’s patience while we work through this challenging period.”

The McMaster University President’s office has not responded to a request for comment.

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